Posts tagged: cookies

Winter Days~

By , February 9, 2015

Snowstorm, (c) The Herbangardener

Gingerbread cookies, (c) The Herbangardener

(c) The Herbangardener

Springtime starting seeds, (c) The Herbangardener

Family laundry, (c) The Herbangardener

(c) The Herbangardener

(c) The Herbangardener

Beef marrow bone broth, (c) The Herbangardener

Doctors office, (c) The Herbangardener

Chat noir, (c) The Herbangardener

Winter aspen branches, (c) The Herbangardener

Aspen branch in water, (c) The Herbangardener

(c) The Herbangardener

Indoor cat grass, (c) The Herbangardener

Smiling orange, (c) The Herbangardener  (c) The Herbangardener

Making cookies, (c) The Herbangardener

Christmas cat toys, (c) The Herbangardener

Brewing, (c) The Herbangardener

Strawbale greenhouse, (c) The Herbangardener

Inside the straw bale greenhouse, (c) The Herbangardener

Mature zucchini, save seed, (c) The Herbangardener

Kitty, (c) The Herbangardener

Zucchini, saving seed, (c) The Herbangardener

(c) The Herbangardener

Lychee, Date palms, and cilantro, (c) The Herbangardener

Clothesline, (c) The Herbangardener

Nebulizer hypertonic saline, (c) The Herbangardener

Burdock in winter, (c) The Herbangardener

Heat lamp, (c) The Herbangardener

Cabbage seedlings, (c) The Herbangardener

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Lindsey’s Pumpkin Spice Cookies

By , November 17, 2011

I made up this cookie recipe this summer and I’m really loving it; it seems like it’s becoming my new go-to recipe. These are perfect for Autumn, and now that cranberries are in season, I’m loving the bright flavor of those — I chop them up and mix into the batter, and then place a cranberry on top of each cookie. I love the candied ginger in these but I think I love the cranberries even more!

Lindsey’s Pumpkin Spice Cookies

1 cup of cooked & pureed pumpkin or winter squash (canned pumpkin is fine too!)

1/4 cup coconut oil or butter, melted (my tummy’s sensitive to fat right now, so I adjust this to  2 Tbsp of oil or butter + 2 Tbsp more of pumpkin — they’re still delicious!)

Rounded 1/2 cup sucanat (sugar)

2 Tbsp molasses

1 egg

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour

1/2 tsp baking soda

2 tsp cinnamon

1 1/2 tsp ground ginger

1/4 tsp salt (and I use a bit more if I’m making these with unsalted butter or oil)

1/2 cup chopped crystallized ginger OR chopped fresh cranberries, or a mixture of both… or something else like nuts, or whatever you like

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Mix the oil, sugar, molasses, and egg. Stir in the pumpkin. Combine all the dry ingredients and stir into the wet ingredients. Mix in the crystallized ginger/cranberries, too, if you’re using those. Drop rounded tablespoonfulls onto a cookie sheet that’s been greased or covered with parchment paper. Place a whole cranberry or a piece of ginger on top of each cookie if you want. Bake at 350° for about 15 minutes or until cookies are lightly golden on the bottom, and hold together when lifted with a metal spatula.

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Gluten-Free Coconut-Cream Bliss Cookies

By , July 21, 2011

I think it’s time for a cookie recipe, and these are absolutely divine! They’re made with coconut cream concentrate (from Tropical Traditions, a favorite company of mine). CCC has the same fat & calorie content as nut butters do, so I like to use it in place of those sometimes. Plus it’s a delicious way to take advantage of the health benefits of coconut.

Lindsey’s Gluten-Free Coconut-Cream Bliss Cookies

1 1/2 cups coconut cream concentrate*

1/2 cup plain yogurt or kefir

1 1/4 cups arrowroot powder

Rounded 1/2 cup sucanat

1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 tsp almond extract

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Heat the coconut cream concentrate over low heat until softened or melted.

Then melt the coconut oil over low heat; remove from heat and mix in the vanilla and almond extracts.

In a large bowl, mix the arrowroot with the sucanat and salt.

Add the coconut cream concentrate and coconut oil to the arrowroot.

Mix until well combined.

The dough should be very nice and workable, not overly sticky. If it’s sticky, add more arrowroot.

Form dough into tablespoon-sized balls and place on a greased cookie sheet (or for easier cookie removal, use parchment paper). Flatten each ball with the palm of your hand or the bottom of a glass.

Bake at 325° for 20-30 minutes or until they hold together and are very lightly browned on the bottom.
Cool a bit and remove from the cookie sheet while still warm. If they cool down and then seem to be glued to the cookie sheet, place them back into the oven to warm up again, and then they’ll be easy to remove.

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* Coconut Cream Concentrate is dried coconut meat which has been ground very finely into a butter, the way nuts would be ground into nut butter. You can cook and bake with it, mix it with water into coconut milk, put it in smoothies, spread it on a tortilla with honey & cinnamon, or eat it plain. The Concentrate will arrive separated into two layers, and you’ll need to mix them first before you use it.

To do that, unscrew the lid and put the jar into a pan of barely simmering water.

Keep the heat as low as it’ll go. This will take a while — you’ll know it’s ready when you stir the concentrate and no chunks remain.

Once it’s smooth, stir it up completely.  (I like to dump it all into a big bowl, which makes stirring easier. Then I pour it back into its jar.)

Transfer the jar to the fridge to solidify. Once it’s solidified, you can remove it from the fridge and store at room temperature. It’ll stay mixed in all but the hottest weather.

Warm your concentrate very gently in a pan of water set on the lowest heat.

Once it's melted and smooth, pour into a bowl and mix until combined. Pour back into the jar and transfer to the fridge to solidify.

Kitchen Tip: Brown Bag Cooling Racks

By , June 27, 2011

I have a little kitchen tip for you today!

Since we live in a small apartment, space is at a premium and we don’t have room for needless kitchenware. And so, among many other things, we don’t own wire cooling racks. If I need a cooling rack, I improvise.

For cookies, I use what my depression-era grandmother used — a cut-up brown paper grocery bag. Just cut it up and lay it on the countertop, transfer your cookies onto it, and fold it up when you’re done…and use it again and again! It hardly takes up any room, and I get to think of my grandma — and bygone days in general — every time I use it.

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What’s one way you improvise in the kitchen?

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Gluten-Free Chunky Monkey Bars

By , May 9, 2011

Time for a recipe! These “Monkey Bars” are a delicious mid-afternoon or after-school snack for both adults and kids — plus they’re grain free and high in protein!

Gluten-Free Chunky Monkey Bars

(Based on this recipe)

1/2 cup coconut flour*

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp baking soda

6 eggs

1/2 cup sucanat (sugar), or 1/3 cup honey

1/3 cup coconut oil, melted

1 Tbsp vanilla

3/4 cup mashed bananas (~2 standard-sized bananas, or 3 smaller ones)

1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

1/3 cup shredded coconut

1/4 cup chocolate chips (optional)

Preheat oven to 350°. Grease a cake pan…mine happens to be 12″ x 7.5″, but you can use a different size and just alter the cooking time as necessary. You could also make these into muffins.

In a medium-sized bowl, stir together the coconut flour, salt, and baking soda. Add everything else and mix well. Pour the batter into the pan and bake for 20-30 minutes, or until golden brown and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool and slice into bars. (For muffins, fill the tins 3/4 full. The baking time is the same. Makes 12 muffins.)

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*If you’re not familiar with coconut flour, it behaves differently than wheat flour; it’s high in fiber and is therefore a very thirsty flour, which is why you don’t need much of it to do the job. 1/2 a cup in this recipe doesn’t seem like nearly enough, but it actually is! Coconut flour also requires lots of eggs to achieve the light texture of wheat-based baked goods. But it’s a lovely flour to work with! Just a little different. I love it. In fact, in this recipe I can’t even tell that there isn’t any actual wheat flour; the texture is light, moist, and tender, and the taste is yummmmmmy! Enjoy these!

Gluten-Free Peanut Cookies

By , March 22, 2011

I tried out a new recipe today, based on the recipe for my favorite Almond Thumbprint Cookies, and it turned out great! If you like classic peanut butter cookies, you’ll love these.

Check it out:

Gluten-Free Peanut Cookies

1 1/2 cups peanuts (I used roasted/unsalted)

1/2 cup melted coconut oil or butter (I like to use 1/4 cup coconut oil & 1/4 cup yogurt or kefir to make these a little less rich for my tummy)

1  1/4 cups arrowroot powder* (start with 1 cup and add more if needed)

1/2 cup sucanat (or a little more if you like)

1/2 tsp sea salt

2 tsp vanilla extract

Place the peanuts into a food processor or blender and pulse to a fine meal (but not into peanut butter).

Transfer peanut meal into a bowl, add the rest of the ingredients, and mix well. As mentioned above, start with 1 cup of arrowroot and add more if needed; I always have to add the extra 1/4 cup. The dough should form a nice ball and not be overly sticky.

Form dough into tablespoon-sized balls and place on an oiled cookie sheet. On each cookie, make the classic crosshatch pattern with a fork.

Bake at 325° for 20-25 minutes, or until cookies are very lightly browned on the bottom and hold together when you lift them up with a metal spatula.

You’ll want to remove your cookies from the cookie sheet without too much delay. If they cool down and then seem to be glued to the cookie sheet, place them back into the oven to warm up again, and then they’ll be easier to remove.

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*Curious about arrowroot? It’s actually not a refined product despite the look of it. It’s the dried, powdered root of a tropical plant that only grows in tidal flats where sea minerals are available. It’s therefore rich in trace minerals and in calcium ash (calcium chloride), which makes it easily digestible. In addition, the calcium ash in arrowroot is very important for maintaining the proper acid-alkali balances in the human body. The downside is its price — $5.35 for a 1lb 4oz bag at our local health food store; however if you have a local Asian store, check with them — I’ve discovered that our local Asian store carries arrowroot for only $2.95/lb!

A Valentine Delight: Almond Thumbprint Cookies

By , February 11, 2011

Almond Thumbprint Cookies with homemade wild grape jam

Actually, these grain-free yummies are excellent at any time of the year, but for Valentine’s Day, fill them with any type of pink, red, or purple fruit jam. They are so good!

This recipe is based on the one from p. 528 of my favorite cookbook, Nourishing Traditions. Makes about 24 cookies.

Almond Thumbprint Cookies

1 1/2 cups whole almonds

1/2 cup melted coconut oil or butter (I like to use 1/4 cup coconut oil & 1/4 cup yogurt or kefir to make them a little less rich for my tummy)

1  1/4 cups arrowroot powder* (start with 1 cup and add more if needed)

Rounded 1/2 cup sucanat

1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 tsp almond extract

Fruit jam of your choice

Place the almonds into a food processor or blender and pulse to a fine meal. Transfer almond meal into a bowl, add the rest of the ingredients, and mix well. As mentioned above, start with 1 cup of arrowroot and add more if needed; I always have to add the extra 1/4 cup. The dough should be very nice and workable — not overly sticky.

Form dough into tablespoon-sized balls and place on an oiled cookie sheet. Make a thumb print in each cookie and fill the indentation with jam.

Bake at 325° for 20-30 minutes, or until cookies are lightly browned on the bottom. I’ve both under-baked and over-baked these, and they’re good no matter what; however I’ve noticed that if they’re under-baked they do tend to fall apart a little more easily.

Cool a bit and remove from the cookie sheet while still warm. If they seem to be glued to the cookie sheet, place them back into the oven to warm up again, and then they’ll be easier to remove.

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*Curious about arrowroot? It’s actually not a refined product despite the look of it. It’s the dried, powdered root of a tropical plant that only grows in tidal flats where sea minerals are available. It’s therefore rich in trace minerals and in calcium ash (calcium chloride), which makes it easily digestible. In addition, the calcium ash in arrowroot is very important for maintaining the proper acid-alkali balances in the human body. Its downside is the price — $5.35 for a 1lb 4oz bag at our local health food store.

Delicious Chocolate-Orange Macaroons

By , July 27, 2010

Well it’s obviously been far too long since I’ve posted a recipe from one of my favorite food groups. So here!

You should definitely try out these macaroons sometime — they’re delicious! I made mine with granulated coconut sugar, which darkens the color of the macaroons as you can see in the picture above. They’re also gluten free if you make them with arrowroot powder instead of whole wheat flour. In fact, I prefer them with arrowroot because of the crunchy-edge-soft-center texture that results!

Chocolate-Orange Macaroons

2 cups unsweetened dried coconut, shredded

2/3 cup sugar (granulated coconut sugar or sucanat are health-minded choices…but use white sugar if it’s important that they be white, like typical macaroons)

1/4 cup arrowroot powder* OR whole wheat flour

1 Tbsp fresh orange zest

1/8 teaspoon salt

1/4 tsp almond extract

2 egg whites, unbeaten (I like to freeze egg whites for times like this)

2 tablespoons coconut oil or unsalted butter, melted

1/4 cup chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a large bowl, mix the coconut, sugar, flour, orange zest, and salt. Stir the almond extract into the egg whites. Then mix the egg whites and coconut oil into the dry coconut mixture. Stir well. Now, mix in the chocolate chips.

Either generously oil your cookie sheet, or line it with parchment paper (the macaroons will be easier to remove from parchment). Form tablespoons of dough into balls and place onto the cookie sheet; they won’t really expand, so you can place them pretty close together. Bake about 10 minutes or until they’re firm to the touch and lightly browned on the bottom.

Cool before serving, and enjoy!

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*Curious about arrowroot? It’s actually not a refined product despite the look of it. It’s the dried, powdered root of a tropical plant that only grows in tidal flats where sea minerals are available. It’s therefore rich in trace minerals and in calcium ash (calcium chloride), which makes it very easily digestible. In addition, the calcium ash in arrowroot is very important for maintaining the proper acid-alkali balances in the human body. Its downside is the price — it’s $5.35 for a 1lb 4oz bag at our local health food store.

Easy No-Bake Peanut Butter Balls

By , May 11, 2010

How was your weekend? Happy Mother’s Day! I had a lovely weekend; I worked part of the day on Saturday and it was thankfully a nice, easy day. When I got home, I was craving chips and salsa for some reason, so F. and I walked down to our favorite Mexican takeout place a few blocks away and brought back chips, guacamole, and salsa, and had a little “food fiesta” on the living room floor in front of the TV. It was really fun. Simple things like that are just the best! On Mother’s Day I had a lovely outing with my mom & dad to a nature preserve with a big lake. It was a gorgeous day, and it felt wonderful to spend some quality time with family and nature.

Also, I’m walking normally now! No more walking cast. And most importantly, I’m riding my bike again, which means FREEDOM! The bus was great there for a while, but nothing can compare to just getting on your bike and going wherever you want, whenever you want! I have a new appreciation for that. I can actually go to the store whenever I want to! By myself! Without looking at a bus schedule! And going to work is an easy 15-minute bike commute compared to the bus, which could take as long as an hour. Anyway, my foot is healing quite well. It’s definitely not 100% yet, but it’s trying. I’m just so thankful to be in normal shoes again. 🙂

Anyway, on to the recipe! It’s super easy! I love these peanut butter balls because they’re so delicious and whip up quickly. I like to take them in my lunches as a treat, and they’re also good for warm-weather “cooking” since they don’t use the oven.

Lindsey’s Easy No-Bake Peanut Butter Balls

1/2 cup peanut butter

1/4 cup chocolate chips

3 Tbsp honey (raw is nice since these don’t get heated)

3 Tbsp coconut flour

If you store your peanut butter in the fridge, let it soften a bit before making these; it’ll be easier to work with.

Mix everything together in a bowl, and roll the mixture into balls. (If the mixture is too sticky, add more coconut flour; if it’s too dry, add more peanut butter.) Store in the refrigerator.

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