Posts tagged: tomatoes

Cheap + Tasty: Greek Melt Pita Sandwiches

By , November 12, 2009

Greek Melt Pita Sandwiches

This dish has a special place in my heart; it was the “last supper” I ate with my very dear childhood friend, Sonja, before she was killed in a car accident the next day. We had the best time out in my garden that day, chattering away and harvesting New Zealand spinach and cherry tomatoes for these delicious Greek Melt Pita Sandwiches. And each time I’ve made them since, I’ve had loved ones around the table to enjoy this dish with me! Everyone loves it!

Since this is a frugal-yet-nourishing dish (not to mention delicious!), I’m linking it up with Pennywise Platter Thursday over at The Nourishing Gourmet.

Greek Melt Pita Sandwiches

Serves 2

1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved (or, chop up regular tomatoes until they measure about a pint)

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 tsp salt

4 oz crumbled feta cheese

2/3 cup plain yogurt

About 2 Tbsp lemon juice

1-2 garlic cloves, minced

1/4 tsp red pepper flakes

1 10-oz bag spinach, washed (or, use frozen spinach for a more frugal option)

2 whole wheat pitas (or, 1 pita split in half to share) (I’ve also used tortillas in a pinch!)

For the tomatoes: Heat oven to 400 degrees. Toss tomatoes with 1 Tbsp olive oil and 1/4 tsp of the salt. Arrange the tomatoes, cut side up, on a baking sheet. (If you don’t want to turn on the oven, this can also be done in a skillet.) Bake till they are just softened, about 10 minutes.

For the sauce: Meanwhile, get a small bowl and whisk together the feta, yogurt, lemon juice, and 1/4 tsp salt; set aside.

For the spinach: Add 1/2 Tbsp of the olive oil to a skillet. Add garlic and red pepper flakes. Cook and stir until garlic is soft and just turning golden. Add the spinach and the remaining 1/2 tsp salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the spinach is just wilted, about 4 minutes.

For the pitas: Brush both sides of the pitas with the remaining 1/2 Tbsp of olive oil. Place in the oven (or into a toaster) and heat till lightly toasted.

To assemble: Place the pitas on plates. Top with the spinach and tomatoes. Drizzle the yogurt-feta sauce on top. Serve open-faced, or fold it in half like a sandwich.

New Zealand Spinach - Greek Melt Pita Sandwiches

New Zealand Spinach from the garden

Siamese Twin Tomatoes

By , October 26, 2009

Siamese Twin Tomato

Tomato haiku, by Lindsey:

A Siamese fruit,

You’re two tomatoes in one.

I have saved your seeds.

Siamese Twin Tomato

Salsa Fresca: Fresh Salsa with Avocado

By , October 25, 2009

Pico de Gallo: Fresh Salsa with Avocado

This recipe is one of our favorite summertime treats, and with all the tomatoes, onions, and jalapenos we harvested, we’re still enjoying it into the fall. If the garden has been good to us, we don’t have to buy anything except the avocados and chips!

Ingredient amounts are pretty flexible — and everyone likes their salsa different, so use this as a guide and let your own preferences take charge!

Salsa Fresca with Avocado

3-4 cups chopped fresh tomatoes

1/2 cup onion, finely diced

1-2 jalapenos, minced

2-3 cloves garlic, minced

1/4 cup chopped cilantro (measured after chopping)

2 Tbsp lime juice

Salt to taste – start with about 1 tsp and go from there

2 avocados, diced (1 avocado is fine, too – or none! Though 2 avocados lend a wonderful richness.)

Gently mix together all ingredients. Taste and adjust ingredient amounts. Ideally, the salsa should sit for at least 30 minutes to allow the flavors to blend, but ours is usually gone by then. ­čÖé Serve with tortilla chips.

How to Save Your Own Tomato Seed

By , October 5, 2009

How to Save Your Own Tomato Seed

If you grow tomatoes in your garden (or if you plan to in the future), you might be curious about saving your own seed. I really love seeds for some reason, and I used to trade seeds on gardenweb.com about 10 years ago. The lovely gardening community at gardenweb (wonder if it even still exists?) was the source for many of the heirloom tomatoes I still grow in my garden. Tomatoes that are called “heirloom” or “open pollinated” are genetically stable, and will produce offspring consistently like themselves (unless they’ve been cross pollinated with something else in your garden, which does happen occasionally!). Hybrid tomatoes are much less stable genetically, and if you save seed from them, you never know what their offspring will be like (which can also be great fun!).

(Click below to continue reading…)

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Lindsey’s Fresh Tomato & Zucchini Chili

By , September 22, 2009
Making the Fresh Tomato + Zucchini Chili

Making the Fresh Tomato & Zucchini Chili

This is a delicious, classic-tasting chili┬árecipe that I created, using only fresh tomatoes. It’s the perfect thing to make on a chilly Autumn evening, when there’s still a bounty of fresh garden produce to use up. (Click below for the recipe…)

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Farm Report: 30 lbs of food!

By , September 6, 2009

Garden harvest September 6 2009

After a week away, the garden didn’t look a whole lot bigger, but there sure was a lot of food in there! 10 lbs of cucumbers, 15 (!) lbs of zucchini, and probably about 5 lbs of tomatoes.

Harvest time is my favorite part of the year. It’s like Christmas! ­čÖé

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